If you have been searching for the perfect place for your beloved mason jars, look no further than Not Just A Housewife and her darling Mason Jar Wall Planter.  Not just for your indoor herb garden, this pretty piece can be used for storing all kinds of stuff!

 

Round up the jars and a drill; we could hardly wait to dive into this project!

 

Please click here to visit Not Just A Housewife and see the instructions that we followed!

 

Reviewer #1 – Sheri

Mission: This just looks awesome, and I have wanted to try it for a while. What a fabulous and unique way to brighten up my kitchen.

 

Details:

As far as directions go, I didn’t find them to be very clear. The final pictures were great, but I would have loved to have seen more of a step by step. Lucky for me, my husband was there to help.

  • My first step was taking care of the drainage. I added rocks to the bottom of the jar, but after reading comments and suggestions on the blog post, I put a straw in for some extra air. I then planted my plants into the mason jars. To be honest, what a pain in the behind. I managed to squeeze them in there, but getting the soil snug around the roots was difficult and I missed a few spots. I’m hoping they survive.
  • I found a great board and cut it to size.
  • Now getting the pipe clamps screwed to the board…I had to call in the big guns, Mr. Hubs…and we broke one or two drill bits trying to do so.  His extra set of hands were also helpful in tightening the mason jars into the clamps and screwing the board to the wall.

This project is definitely a two person job. We had a much needed beer together afterwards.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

Duct tape a straw for extra drainage. Just make sure you put it in the back when you clamp the jar. Make sure you have good quality drill bit to put a hole through the metal clamp. Screw the hole first and then screw the clamp to the board

Sheri - Planter 1

Pros:

It looks remarkable.

Cons:

Getting those plants into the small mouth of the jar is difficult. Oh, and the broken drill bits. I’ll be replacing those for my husband.

Sheri - Planter 2

Conclusion:

We absolutely LOVE the final outcome. It came out great. I find myself just staring at it while waiting for my coffee to brew. I hope the plants survive. I would love to do one with herbs.

 

 

Reviewer #2 – Kristy

Mission: I love the idea of growing fresh herbs and making a lovely piece of wall décor!

 

Details:

Maren and I got together for this project as I felt it was a bit intimidating and a great excuse to get together!

Tips & Tricks Learned:

5Stain or Paint your board if you want to. Maren and I decided to go bare finish as you can always change it later.

Be sure to measure where your planters will need to be hung, then predrill your holes on the board.  Be sure to also drill holes for hanging!

Ok, here was the tough part, drilling through the metal holders. Just picture Maren with the drill and me fearful of this gal drilling into my fingers as I had to hold metal holders in place.  (Fear left with each cocktail we had…be careful!  Ha!!) Maren was having issues getting the drill through the metal so plan B, she grabbed her pink hammer to nail through it.  Bad idea did not work, just bent the nail.  We went back to the drill and replaced with a new battery then bam…worked perfectly. Well…a couple of broken drill bits later!

Once the holes are drilled, fasten the metal hangers onto boards then you are ready to fasten your awesome jars!

Best tip, when working with the metal hangers loop the tail end to the screw end then just start turning to the right to tighten. It is a simple as that, but we had to learn this.

Maren had a bright idea, to place rocks at the bottom of the mason jars…not only is it cute but I would assume it is also supposed to help with the plant’s survival.

M + K Planter 1

Pros:

Super cute wall décor and a great way to cook healthy with fresh herbs on hand!  There are such a wide variety of fresh herbs so the options are endless!  As for the board, you could be so creative with jars or painted boards!

Cons:

Holy cow, the metal hangers…you need some muscle action and a full battery to break through those, but well worth it!

Kristy - Planter

Conclusion:

Love, love, love! Get your favorite herbs and get busy!  I hope to make these for a few of my real estate clients that love gardening!  I know they will love this gift as much as I do!  My plants are thriving indoors…now Maren has a different story!

 

 

Reviewer #3 – Maren

Mission:  I was so excited to try this project out, I love to have fresh herbs.  This is the perfect way to get a start on some gardening as well, since we don’t have a yard quite yet at our new home.  Kristy and I did this project while our husbands cooked burgers on the grill!

Details:

I didn’t have time to hit the store for all of my supplies so I hit up Amazon instead.

Then, I had no idea how big they were or what size of clamp to order, until I found the All American Canner site after a quick Google and got the dimensions of my jars!

Kristy‘s honey grabbed a few of our items at the Home Depot:

  • The dimensions of my oak board were 5″ x 22″ x 3/4″
  • Our screws were 3/4″ long with a flat, Phillips head.
  • For my plants, I chose Moroccan Mint, Italian Flat Leaf Parsley and Cilantro.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

Don’t drink and drill.  You heard me.  This was probably my biggest take-away of the night.  Kristy and I took a dinner break and when I came back to finish the project, I wasn’t um, quite as qualified for the job.  I almost amputated my finger trying to push a screw in, when after [what felt like] 15 minutes we realized that the drill was set on “reverse”.  Nice.

Use the Phillips-type drill bit to make the holes in your clamp.  We tried drilling and nailing and both were total failures.  The only thing that worked was pushing the Phillips bit into the clamp while running the drill.  I needed Kristy‘s fingers to keep the clamp open while I pushed and drilled.

Don’t cry if you break a drill bit.  I broke two.  I think that it didn’t help that I had my board sitting on a towel instead of a solid, flat surface.  That of course, and the booze.

The clamp closes by a screw mechanism running along a little track.  Having said that, tightening the clamp by hand could take a while.  Save yourself some time and use your drill – just be sure to go slowly so you don’t take off and break your jar.

Be sure to add little rocks on the bottom for drainage!

Put your plants in before you tighten the clamps around the jars.  Duh.

Do not over-water your cilantro or leave it outside in cooler temps unless you want it to die in 3 days.

Be sure to also have a trusty Quality Assurance Supervisor nearby.  See if you can find ours in the photo below!

Maren - Planter 1

Pros:

This project was easy to do and cute as heck.

Cons:

“Don’t drink and drill.”

Maren - Planter 2

Conclusion:

Since my initial review, I have painted my board aqua and now love my planter even more!  I did give my Cilantro the ax after a few days, but have high hopes for the plant that takes it’s place!

I have also already started on a second planter to use to store my paint brushes – the long ones that don’t really fit anywhere else.

 

 

Reviewer #4 – Sarah

Mission: Any project that uses Mason jars is a project I’m instantly going to try! I love them to pieces!!

 

Details:

I love the idea of this project so much, but honestly am not a good houseplant owner, as they always seem to die on me at some point. So I instead opted to create this project to store my jewelry tools for my Sarah Vonne creations.

  • Mason jars can always be found in my house, so I searched through my supply and found two of the three, wide mouth, quart size Mason jars. The lovely Maren loaned me the third and also had extra clamps for me to use!
  • We still have lots of extra barn wood from my grandfather’s barn that was torn down late last year – this is the same wood I used in the Knob Organizer review. I just love it as it is a constant reminder of my grandfather and anywhere I can sprinkle it into a project, I just have to! My husband helped me pick out the right board for this project and did all the hard carpentry work for me.
  • The barn wood needed to be cut down to size for use on this project, so my husband took care of that with the table saw. We opted to leave the height of the board as it was and just cut it down to 22” in length. I wanted to maintain as much of the character of the board as we could.
  • Once the board was cut, we drilled holes into the metal brackets and then screwed them into place on the board. After this, I slid each of the Mason jars into place and tightened the brackets with a screwdriver until the jars were secure.

I have yet to secure it to the wall above my crafting table, but I have placed all of my jewelry tools within the jars so I’m ready to set up shop.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

Find your handsome hubby and put him to work! Just kidding, this isn’t a mandatory, but I always love  when mine is willing to help.

Sarah - Planter 1

Pros:

Purposeful – which is a factor I absolutely love! And, this project has an array of uses for each individual out there; a planter, a tool holder, a utensil holder, etc.

Cons:

In my case, I needed a handy man, so it would have been a bit difficult for me to finish this one on my own.

Sarah - Planter 2

Conclusion:

Love it and can’t wait to get it secured onto the wall.

 

Planter Conclusion


The darling
Mason Jar Wall Planter and it’s photo by Not Just A Housewife


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You may recall our recent attempt at Sugar and Charm‘s colorful and functional Enamel Painted Vases.

After much frustration on our first try, we felt even more determined to get this gorgeous glassware into our homes!

A second attempt was born!  Kristy and Maren went for round 2, and lived on to tell the tale…

 

Please click here to visit Sugar and Charm and see the instructions that we followed!

 

Reviewer #1 – Maren

Mission: Get it right!  I want to nail this technique so that I can recreate on a much larger scale for our new house!

 

Details:

In accordance with my last vows to myself, I tried to find a thinner paint and a Surface Primer.

  • Surface Primer… I must be a complete idiot.  If I would have had my thesaurus with me at JoAnn, I would have realized that “Prime” and “Prep” are basically the same word.  Surface Primer MUST be Gesso!!!  I felt like a genius.  (please be sure to read on to “Tips & Tricks”)
  • I used another one of my vintage jars dug out of our property.
  • Thinner paint?  We’ll see, I guess.  I chose Americana Acrylic Paint in Indian Turquoise.  I also added a little pearly paint that I have on hand for an upcoming post.
  • Alcohol.  Yes, I first first cleaned the interior glass surface with it; I also drank some.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

You may recall my “Frustration Scale” from the last post.  I wasn’t entirely out of the water here.

With zen-like calm, perhaps mostly alcohol induced, I began my second attempt at the coveted Enamel Painted Vase.

Feeling like a freaking genius, I began by first applying my Gesso.  Fail.  It’s F-ing white.  Start over.  Count 1-2 F-bombs.

I attempt to chill the hell out as recommended to myself in the previous post.

Starting fresh, I applied my first coat of paint and walked away for 15 minutes to let dry as instructed.  Upon my return, same problem as before.  The paint wasn’t dry enough and when I went to smooth it out, I only picked it up and moved it around.  Also, my new paint was only slightly thinner than my Martha paint, and therefore never dripped out like it should have.  Oh boy.  I let it sit over night and returned to apply my second coat in the morning.

The second coat did the trick.  I was done after that!  Yay!  I did blob some extra paint into the jar and knock around by tapping the side of the jar onto the bottom of my palm.  This helped to satisfy my anal retentive side and get a smoother coat on the bottom, even though no one will ever see it.

In the end, It’s great!  I’ll still do this project again. #1 thing for me to plan for – letting each coat dry overnight.  That’s it.  Simple as that.

Pros:

Easy.  They look great, no matter how you get there!

Cons:

Requires multiple coats of paint; each coat needs to dry overnight.  This can be frustrating.

Conclusion:

I love the end result of this project.

They look great when finished and I  truly am excited to recreate on a larger scale once we decorate our new home!

 

 

Reviewer #2 – Kristy

Mission: Attempt to redeem myself from the first attempt at the enameled vases. Looking forward to create new staging piece for my home.

Details:

  • I read the directions again and noticed once the interior vase is painted, only hold over for minutes not over night as I did before. Ha!! Focus!
  • The project called for surface cleaner and I still did not find this so I did without again!
  • Used Folk Art enamel paint in Folk Art Enamel Acrylic Paint in Lemon Custard …perfect color for my décor.  I mixed it with the Folk Art Enamel in White Frost to achieve a frosted look (I honestly have no idea if it made a difference.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

Get extra paint, maybe swirling the paint in the vase instead of painting with a brush could work better.

Pros:

It’s pretty cheap to decorate! Great impact of color!

Cons:

It’s fully streaked so I have to put this up on a shelf so no one can peek in the inside.

It took a while to dry and the paint wasn’t flowing out.

Conclusion:

Second attempt was better than the first but nothing like the website.  This is a bit too advanced of a craft project for me! Ha!

It does look pretty great but only if you don’t see it from the inside!  I most likely won’t do this project for a 3rd time!

 

 

Miss our meltdown the first time around?

Check out Enamel Painted Vases: Round One!


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Sugar and Charm has shared the trick to getting vibrantly colored glassware for less in her tutorial for Enamel Painted Vases.

We love the chic and modern look of these colorful, and functional pieces.

 

Please click here to visit Sugar and Charm and see the instructions that we followed!

 

Reviewer #1 – Maren

Mission: I really love the look of these vases.  I see them all the time on Pinterest, and I just can’t get enough!  I am really excited to learn this technique, as I think that it will be a fun way to add pops of color to our home decor.

Details:

  • I decided to start on a smaller scale, so I used 2 vintage jars that I [no kidding] dug out of the dirt in the back of our property!   The existing home that was torn down was built in 1904, so they had their own little dump in back.  We found all sorts of weird shit; bowling balls, rusty bikes, beer cans… and tons of little glass jars!
  • Of course, I used Martha Stewart Craft Paint.  I love you Martha.
  • I didn’t know what the H surface primer was.  Is it Gesso?  I also couldn’t find anything called “Surface Primer” at JoAnn… so I skipped it.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

#1 use a craft paint with a thinner consistency.  I love you Martha, but the paint was too thick to drip out as I expected.  Also, too thick to dry within 15 minutes – when I went to even it out I just picked up the paint that was drying and moved it around 🙁  This was extremely frustrating.  Perhaps this was the purpose of the “surface primer”…

After screwing up my previously painted interior several times since the first coat wasn’t totally dry, I decided that I should probably create some type of “Frustration Scale” for you.  Example:  This project resulted in 3 F Bombs, 2 S.O.B.’s and an undocumented number of “sh*ts.”

I needed to step away… Rosie and I made our Salt Dough Paw Prints.

The only way this was going to work was for each coat to totally dry.  I left them sit overnight.  The following morning I was a little sad to see that the deep ridges from my thick paint and brush strokes had dried in tact.  Whatever, no one will be looking inside.  I proceeded to apply 2 more coats, waiting about 12 hours in between each.  Yes, this project took me 3 days to complete.

In the end, I LOVE them!  They’re great!  I know that I’ll do this project again with the lessons learned – use thinner paint, apply a surface primer – I will use Gesso, and chill the hell out.

A total plus to using Martha’s Paint… if I leave them alone and wait 21 days for them to “cure,” they’ll be dishwasher safe!!!  WHAT!!  See, I knew I loved you, Martha.

Pros:

They look great!

Cons:

Not exactly the most relaxing project on the first go for an OCD wreck like me, but will be much better the next time!  I think that I’ll add vodka first… to me.

Conclusion:

Even though I nearly had a nervous breakdown trying to get these to look perfect, I definitely intend on doing this project again.  I truly love the end result.  Although they might be rough on the inside… they appear perfect on the outside so no need to fret!

I can’t wait to recreate on a larger scale once we decorate our new home!

 

 

Reviewer #2 – Kristy

Mission: I was hesitant to do this project but I knew it was one I would enjoy learning!  I am redoing my bedroom décor and I know yellow vases would be perfect. I will start small then I may do a few more pieces for my office.

Details:

  • I chose a glass container with a lid as it cost me .60 cents helping keep the cost down and I didn’t want to ruin the glass vase I purchased.  This was my tester for color and to see the results before continuing on other pieces. I did not purchase any frost or the surface conditioner so I am crossing my fingers that this project turns out.
  • For color I chose Apple Barrel Acrylic Paint, in Bright Yellow, which cost me $1.00.
  • To start the project, I cleaned the jar well then squeezed a generous amount of yellow paint into the container.
  • I snapped the lid on to more easily swirl the paint around the container.  I was extremely generous on the paint, as a result, it was quick and easy to coat.  I did not have a small paint brush on hand so I needed the extra squeeze of paint.  The edges were more difficult to cover so I simply used my fingers to spread paint to cover the edges. I did notice a couple of tiny bubbles but so small that I don’t think anyone will notice.
  • Once painted, I flipped the container over on a stack of paper towels and let the paint drip out to begin the drying process.
  • Being the impatient person that I am, I decided to see how much paint had drained out.  A TON, so let it sit.  Just walk away or you will have a huge mess!
  • Get ready for the extra paint; it looks like most of it will drain out while I have it sit out over-night.
  • The finished project did not turn out as expected.  I guess having the glass sit out in 107 degree weather with humidity was a very bad idea. Sad, all of the paint dripped out.

Tips & Tricks Learned:

Don’t move the vase or container after flipping it, as it makes a huge mess.  It’s best just to fold several napkins and set the container directly on top and let it be until it dries.

Be prepared, have the paint brush on hand so you won’t have to use quite as much paint or your fingers.  I was a little nervous that the brush might make the glass streaky. You would likely use less paint if you could paint the inside with the brush instead of my technique.

Keep the bugs away; I had little bugs join in the paint party as I was completing my project on the ground.

Beware of the temperature, set it inside if it is too hot or too humid outside.

Pros:

It was cheap and makes such an impact of color.  This project cost me under $2.00!

Cons:

It’s a little messy and the unknown of how it will turn out.

Conclusion:

This project did not turn out as expected but I will definitely do again!  Next time I will be conscious of the weather as that will play a role in this project. There are so many varieties of colors and textures that can be used.  I want to try the frosted acrylics and create white vases for my offices. This is a cute idea for gifts, too!  It is an easy project to make such an impact on your home décor, I hope next time the heat doesn’t destroy the finished project.

Stay tuned as I will be redoing this project as time permits!

 

The lovely Enamel Painted Vases photo taken by Sugar and Charm

 

We gave this project a second shot!

Check out Enamel Painted Vases: Part Deux!


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